John Wesley quote commission

My most recent commission was a quote from John Wesley written in Cancelleresca Corsiva. The client wanted celtic knots in the border although she and I were aware that it didn’t exactly fit the time period or style. However, a little extra Celtic knot never hurts!

© Letizia Morley 2019

Daffodowndilly poem with watercolour illustration

A friend recently commissioned a calligraphy piece for her baby’s nursery room. She asked for A.A. Milne’s Daffodowndilly poem with a watercolour illustration next to it of daffodils, variegated tulips and trillium. I used the Garlic Butter typeface as the basis for this hand-lettered script. I am not often completely happy with my work but this piece came out much to my satisfaction.

©Letizia Morley 2019

Grace prayer with rosemary border

In June I was commissioned by my church, Saint Andrew’s Scottish Episcopal Church in St Andrews, to create a goodbye present for a long-time congregation member who was moving way. They wanted the grace prayer and some sprigs of rosemary (her name was Rosemary) along with the Diocese of St Andrews coat of arms. There are a few purple rosemary flowers scattered throughout and some bees since our rector keeps bee hives.

© Letizia Morley 2019

Baby Birth Facts illuminated calligraphy, start to finish process

Recently an acquaintance asked me to do an illuminated calligraphy piece for her new baby. She wanted wall art that included Celtic knots, thistles and rabbits with a colour scheme of coral, blue and green. I am hoping there are more clients who are interested in this kind of thing for either their own children or as gifts. The finished product was something I was very happy with and my client felt the same way, thankfully. 

The first stage of this work began with my sketching out lightly in pencil the Celtic knot border. I had to look through many design templates to find what worked best for the dimensions of the paper and the style that the client wanted. The Celtic knots took quite a lot of practice…quite a lot

© Letizia Morley 2018
The second stage was writing the lettering. This took relatively little time but what took up quite a deal of time was the many hours practising the script. I like to learn many types of scripts so I often need to brush up on some less familiar ones when a client picks what font/script they want. This is the Artifical Uncial script. Following that I drew the Celtic knots freehand.

© Letizia Morley 2018

The next step after the Celtic knots and going over all the pencil with archival ink was to drawing the thistles and rabbits. These took hardly any time at all, with a few reference photos. I began to put paint on the piece after I had gone over all the pencil marks with black Sumi ink (Sumi is a Japanese coal ink that is very thick and long-lasting). I used Winsor & Newton watercolours.

© Letizia Morley 2018

Lastly, the blue green Celtic knots were filled in and the spaces between the lines painted in coral. Then the thistles were finished and voila!

Gothic Calligraphy Practice

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© Letizia Morley 2018

It takes me a long long time to practise scripts where I feel comfortable doing a finished project. Here I was working on my gothic textura quadrata font, which was popular in the 1400s and 1500s. It has a gently hypnotic effect with its forest of tall, narrow, rectangular letters so close together. The text is from an old Shaker song of 1848 from America’s New England area. Shakers, similar to the Quakers, were a small religious group that began in the 18th century in England and migrated to the New World. They were known for having simple lifestyles so this song expresses that sentiment. I can’t say the textura quadrata font actually matches the song’s message, but I just picked a text at random.

Celtic Blessing Illuminated Calligraphy

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© Letizia Morley 2017

Lately I have been trying to make some more Scottish themed illuminated calligraphy and decided to write out this Celtic blessing in the Artificial Uncial script. The Celtic knots here are identical, but are rotated in different directions for a nice contrast. It took a long time but I am happy with the result.

Here’s the text, which I think is wonderful: “May you have: walls for the wind, a roof for the rain, and drinks by the fire; laughter to cheer you, those you love near you and all that your heart may desire.”

Enjoy and I hope you have some laughter and warmth today.

If you enjoy this artwork, feel free to browse my zazzle shop for products featuring it. Go to http://www.zazzle.com/letiziamorley or http://www.zazzle.co.uk/letiziamorley.

Isaiah Calligraphy in Scottish Celtic Knot

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© Letizia Morley 2017

Hot off the press! I just finished this illuminated calligraphy piece yesterday in preparation for making some Christmas cards on my Zazzle shop. This has passages from Isaiah 7 and 9 about Immanuel, the Son of God. I used the Uncial script, which dates to the 3rd century and was developed in the British Isles. The Celtic Knot is Scottish in style. I am pretty happy with how this turned out and plan to make more like it.